Internet privatization: a new non-territorial governance model?

As As shown by the ICANN website,  from October 1, 2016  the contract between the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) and the United States Department of Commerce National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), to perform the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions expired.

From now on,  Internet enviroment is managed by a multistakeholders system very different of the way territorial goverments that we know works. This means that new forms of regulation are possible, regardless of national regulations and countries.

According to ICANN Board Chair Stephen D. Crocker  ‘a governance model defined by the inclusion of all voices, including business, academics, technical experts, civil society, governments and many others is the best way to assure that the Internet of tomorrow remains as free, open and accessible as the Internet of today.

People from different economic sectors, cultures, interests and backgrounds worked together to develop two proposals consensus that would ensure continuous, stable and secure services IANA performance and greater accountability of ICANN as coming from one of the two great transition proposals.

Our point is that we should look closely the operation of this management model as it could be exportable to other relationships in which the territorial element can not be applied,  and in consequence can allow troubleshoot application of standards or determination of jurisdiction in what now seems an unattainable solution.